Welcome to
The Manipulus/Lucula Project

This website provides an Open Access revised edition of the Lucula noctis (1405) by Giovanni Dominici, O.P. (d.1419), based upon Edmund Hunt's critical edition of this text (University of Notre Dame Press, 1940), which superseded the 1908 edition published at Paris by Remi Coulon.

The Lucula is an extended scholastic critique of humanist education that Dominici, a Florentine Dominican, sent to Coluccio Salutati, Chancellor of Florence and the pre-eminent humanist scholar of his day.

In the process of editing Thomas of Ireland's influential florilegium for The Electronic Manipulus florum Project, I discovered that Dominici made extensive use of this anthology of authoritative quotations from classical, patristic and medieval writers. This discovery has inspired me to propose a new critical edition of the Lucula. Further details are provided in my forthcoming article "Giovanni Dominici's Reception of Thomas of Ireland's Manipulus florum: The Case for a New Critical Edition of the Lucula noctis" (currently under review). I intend to maintain this website only until the new edition appears, at which time it will be deleted.

The revised edition provided on this website doesn't reproduce Hunt's critical apparatus for the three extant manuscripts, nor does it replicate his source apparatus for the various quotations and textual references in this text. What it does provide is identification of 78 quotations that were surely or very likely derived by Dominici from the Manipulus florum.

Since March 2016, the revised edition of Dominici's prologue and all 47 chapters has been accessible via the Capitula Page. The 78 quotations that have been identified as being definitely or probably derived from the Manipulus florum are highlighted and supplied with a marginal link to a PDF source apparatus file for that quotation, which provides the versions in the Lucula and the Manipulus in parallel columns along with the corresponding passage from the original source/s, and in some cases the intermediate source/s as well. Variants in the Manipulus and the original source/s are indicated by breaks in underscoring.


©2015-17 Chris L. Nighman
History Department
Wilfrid Laurier University
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada